Thursday, August 22, 2013

Group of Women 1910's



Edit: "From left to right back row
first row
Emma Lange,

Clara 
Brieschke,2) row Clara Lange Wells
Emma Zimmerling Kossow,
3 Bertha and Anna Zimmerling"


Thanks for the help with this!

(Unfortunately, I couldn't make sense of all the names here. Maybe someone could help me out with that?)

I don't know about a man with two wives, like in this week's Sepia Saturday prompt, but I do have some sisters! Two Emmas and two Claras. It seems Emma Lange and Clara Lange are sisters. Emma Z., Bertha, and Anna are family (is Bertha the mother?). Clara B. doesn't appear to fit in with any of the families. Maybe she was just a friend?

If you know who any of these ladies may be, let us know in the comments!




21 comments:

  1. That is a lovely layout for the postcard.

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  2. Very attractive grouping. A creative photographer.

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  3. Lovely photo. I think it could be Lange, not Louge. Clara Lange Wells, 1884-1961, Marysville, Kansas.
    Lange seems to be common in Kansas
    On this page http://skyways.lib.ks.us/genweb/marshall/zimtowle.html you will fina Emma Zimmerling married Henry Kossow.
    Hope ths helps

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  4. I like how the six have been positioned for this photo , it works well
    Jackie
    Scrapbangwallop

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  5. Two groups of three! Charming ladies.

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  6. How does this sound?
    Emma Lange,
    Clara Brieselike,
    Emma Zimmerling Kossow,
    Bertha and Anna Zimmersling

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    Replies
    1. I think that's spot on, thank you so much!

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  7. Three times two...maybe somebody will find a 3-squared photo of nine...

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  8. I've not seen that arrangement before. Welcome to Sepia Saturday.

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  9. I really like the arrangement of the six women (3 and 3), it gives me an idea if ever I am called to take such a photo...great post!

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  10. It's a lovely photo. They're all so stylish.

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  11. Lovely photo, I hope you find some of their family to reunite them with.

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  12. That is an interesting way the women are posed. It is really hard to figure out unfamiliar last names from that handwriting--so many of the letters are ambiguous.

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  13. The way the women are posed it is almost an strange mirror image turned outside. Very interesting. Great choice.

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  14. What an unusual pose - I like it.

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  15. Quite a different take with photographer, nicely done!

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  16. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  17. I read CLARA BRIESCHKE
    In the United States Federal Census of 1930 there were quite a number of persons with this familyname, mainly in Illinois, Missouri, and Michigan. Also in other states with spelling variations.

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    Replies
    1. Now that I take a look at it, Brieschke makes more sense. Thanks!

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  18. Zimmerling: Besides the webpage boundforoz mentioned above, there is anotherone of the same origin: http:// familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/l/e/i/Marcy-L-Leipard/index.html
    It contains an email-address, so I send one to Marcy Leipard to inform her. Hope a connection can be made.

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  19. Hi again,

    I just saw this post as well. As I mentioned, Eda Clara Zimmerling is my great-great grandmother. Bertha is not the mother, but is one of the sisters. Their mother was Karoline Pohl Weber Zimmerling. She was born in Liatkwe, Prussia on June 8, 1837. She was married first to a man named Weber, with whom she had one son, Robert Weber. After her husband passed away, she married Ernest Zimmerling.

    Ernest Frederick Zimmerling was born on November 25, 1833 in Wehlige Kreis Militsch, Prowinz Schlesien, Prussia. He first married Christine Fleischer on November 15, 1853. They had two children, August and Christine Zimmerling Wohlschlaeger. Christine Fleischer died in Germany on July 3, 1864.

    Ernest then married Karoline Pohl Weber in Germany (or Prussia?) on January 28, 1865. They had nine children together: Augusta, Albertena, Eda, Berthold, Bertha, Annie, Ernest, Ema and Oscar. My great-great grandmother, Eda, was born in Germany.
    Ernest emigrated to the U.S. in 1876, landing on December 6. He came as far west as Kansas where he was given a land grant in Franklin Township, Marshall County. His wife, Karoline, came eleven years later, bringing the children. Her son from her fist marriage, Robert Weber, did not get along well with his step-father, Ernest, and returned to Germany to live with his grandparents.

    In Home, KS, Ernest Zimmerling, as well as the Tangeman side of my family, built the German Lutheran Church. Ernest had been a gardener in Germany and, upon arriving in America became a farmer. He died in Home, KS on October 3, 1905. Karoline Pohl (also spelled Caroline Paul) died on April 6, 1902.

    Emma Otille Zimmerling had a Christmas wedding to Mr. Henry Wilhelm Edward Kossow. They made their home on his family farm in Carden.

    Oscar Zimmerling married Clara Brandt of St. Joseph (Missouri or Kansas, not sure) on November 25 (unsure of year). They made their home on a farm in Home, Kansas near Oscar's family.

    Eda Clara Zimmerling married Gottlieb John "Jack" Tangeman (previously spelled Tangemann. His parents, John and Christine Tangeman were also German immigrants. Jack and Eda had three children, Elsa Tangeman Clark, Eric Tangeman, and Esther, who died as an infant. Eric Tangeman is my great-grandfather.

    That's probably more information than you needed, but hope it helps! Let me know if you have any questions.

    Malory Tangeman Shaath

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